We usually take for granted many of the objects we use every day — we don't think much about how long these things have been around, how they were invented and how people got along without them before that.
Here is a list of the oldest known household objects. Compare them to the things you have at home.
Stop squinting! This 800-year-old pair of sunglasses was discovered in Canada. They're meant to protect the wearer from snow blindness.
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Safety first: this condom from 17th century Sweden is made of sheep's skin. The instructions recommended rinsing it out with warm milk to prevent venereal diseases.
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This pair of wool socks is from Egypt and is approximately 1,500 years old. Don't worry, people back then didn't have strange feet — these were specially made so they could be worn with sandals.
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At 3,300 years old, this is the oldest prosthetic in the world. As with the socks, this also comes from ancient Egypt and could be worn with sandals.

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The oldest existing bra in the world. It was worn between 1390 and 1485 in Austria.
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They weren't very private, but they did have a flush. These public toilets in Turkey are around 2,000 years old and had running water underneath to carry away the waste.
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The oldest piece of chewing gum is from Finland and is about 5,000 years old. It is made of birch tree resin and was used to treat mouth infections (or possibly to repair broken tableware).
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These boots are made for walking: this moccasin is about 5,500 years old and was found in a cave in Armenia. The left one was never found.
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These pants might not look as good as our jeans today, but they clearly wear as least as long. They were discovered in western China and are around 3,300 years old.
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This very special artifact is 40,000 years old and was found in southern Germany. It's the oldest musical instrument ever to be discovered. The earliest wind instruments were made from bird bones or mammoth teeth. 
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Looking at these objects today, they seem very strange and primitive. But who knows? Maybe our smartphones and electric toothbrushes will look the same to the people who find them thousands of years from now!
h/t http://www.hefty.co/

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